Pay per head news: Just one man standing.

Just one man left that wore a cubs jersey at the world seires.

21 05 14 - 07:30 Used tags: , ,

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With a movement of his arm, Lennie Merullo moved up the sleeve of his cardigan sweater to uncover a weak scar on his left lower arm. He was in the lounge area of his Victorian house, scrapbooks brimming with old daily paper clippings from his baseball vocation spread on the table before him.

Merullo, 97, a previous Chicago Cubs shortstop, wore a Cubs polo shirt under his sweater. A Cubs cover was hung over a lounge chair in the following room. He had a more prized gift, however; it dated to the 1945 World Series, the last time the Cubs arrived at baseball's greatest stage.

With a movement of his arm, Lennie Merullo moved up the sleeve of his cardigan sweater to uncover a weak scar on his left lower arm. He was in the lounge area of his Victorian house, scrapbooks brimming with old daily paper clippings from his baseball vocation spread on the table before him.

Merullo, 97, a previous Chicago Cubs shortstop, wore a Cubs polo shirt under his sweater. A Cubs cover was hung over a lounge chair in the following room. He had a more prized gift, however; it dated to the 1945 World Series, the last time the Cubs arrived at baseball's greatest stage.
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He pointed at the flimsy, white line close to his elbow, still obvious almost seven decades after he was spiked throughout a play at a respectable halfway point in Game 6.

"I scratched the scab for weeks," he said. "Since I needed a bit of the World Series to keep until the end of time."

Merullo is a legacy today, with or without his scar. At the point when his previous buddy Andy Pafko passed on a year ago, Merullo turned into the last surviving player from the 1945 Cubs. By excellence of the MLB group's purposelessness, he is the main living ballplayer to have worn a Cubs uniform in the World Series, an ambivalent refinement for both Merullo and most likely the eras of forbearing Cubs fans like him.

Photograph

Merullo has a daily paper cutting of his battle with the Dodgers' Eddie Stanky.

I figure that makes me celebrated MLB player , he said with a laugh. Anyway, oh rapture, I'd beyond any doubt like to see them win one.

On a late spring evening, situated adjacent to his children Dave and Len, who is known as Boots, he let a nostalgic smile cross his face while recollecting that World Series despite the fact that his Cubs tumbled to the Detroit Tigers in seven recreations. World War II had quite recently finished and Philip K. Wrigley, the Cubs' holder, gave a gathering for the group on a steamer moored in Lake Michigan to praise the flag.

In the wake of beginning for a great part of the season at shortstop, Merullo was hitless in his just two at-bats in the World Series. Be that as it may he was on the field as a tenth inning substitute when Joe Hoover, who had singled with two outs in a 7-7 amusement, was discovered taking second in the highest point of the twelfth inning of Game 6